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Wedding Photographs of the Party

Wedding photographs of the party by Philip White // I’m writing this sat on a busy airport floor in Pisa. There’s no seats available and my body is aching from yesterday’s wedding. I have what many of us in the industry call ‘Wedding hangover’. Just a few hours ago I was photographing the final stages of a beautiful, intimate wedding in Tuscany.

The final piece of any Wedding Photography collection is usually the wedding photographs of the party. The entire day’s emotional build up is released through the power of music and dance! Yet again just as we’ve encountered so many variations of each other section of the day, the party is no different.

I often take for granted the way that I photograph certain sections of a day. I’ve spoken on other pages here about being more of a decision maker than a Wedding photographer. Taking wedding photographs of the party and in particular, guests on a dance floor is no different. A continuous balancing act between capturing great images and being a complete annoyance. If I’d decided to get up and dance and immediately had a camera in my face, I’d be pissed off.

There’s so many factors come in to play here. If you’ve  built relationships successfully throughout the day and broken down barriers with certain groups then taking wedding photographs of the party becomes easier. Joining the action at an appropriate time and throwing in a few moves of your own often helps. If you’ve remaining an outsider throughout the day, photographing from far away then you’ll just look creepy when the dancing starts. It’s about recognising which guests don’t care, and which may want to be left alone. It’s about recognising that it’s sometimes better to simply put your camera away for thirty minutes until the party warms up.

None of these decisions actually relate to our photography skills. That’s a whole new set of decisions. How do you make a dance floor that isn’t particularly busy look like the party of the century? How do you use the light that’s available? What if there’s no light? These are all things that simply come with experience and I’m not going to start writing the manual here.

Every party and every dance floor is different. Unfortunately every ‘Wedding hangover’ feels the same.

Contact Philip about Wedding Photography today

So if you like what you see and my wedding photographs of dancing are the kind of thing you’d like to look through in years to come, get in touch. I’d love to hear from you x

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